Thom Brannan and D.L. Snell

Today I’m bringing you a bit of treat.  This is the first of two multi-author interviews, and I decided to make that pairing D.L. Snell and Thom Brannan, two writers who have managed to join their voices into a perfect chorus to form the Pavlov’s Dogs series, which features genetically engineered werewolves against zombies.  Having read the books in manuscript form I can tell you they are a high-octane thrill ride you do not want to miss.

Up first in our little round robin is author Thom Brannan.  Thom has got one of those man’s man kind of biographies that makes readers salivate over what insights he is going to give us in his fiction.  The man has been a submariner, a nuclear operator, an electrician, and has even worked on an offshore drilling platform.  Looking at this guy’s resume you just know he’s got a whole host of stories waiting in the wings.  He now lives in Austin (again, there’s that Texas and zombies thing; go figure!) with his wife, Kitty, a son and a daughter, and a cat and dog.  In other words, he’s a man with his hands full.

But he’s got another label to put into his biography, and that is literary detective.  You see, one of our most promising voices in zombie fiction, Mr. ZA. Recht, was taken from us way too soon. Recht left his Morningstar Trilogy unfinished and until Thom came along, it looked like it would never be finished.  But Thom, with the blessing of Recht’s family, friends and publisher, went through all of Recht’s notes and outlines and rough sketches and managed to create a thrilling conclusion to the series that had fans like me cheering his name.

But Thom has also worked on another amazing zombie novel with my other guest for today, Mr. D.L. Snell.  David and I go way back.  David was one of the first writers to comment on my novel Dead City, and shortly after his reviews came out online, I contacted him with a good old-fashioned thank you note.  We started trading emails, and a tight friendship grew from that.  I have cheered him through the many novels and short stories he’s published since, from Roses of Blood on Barbwire Vines to his recent works, Pavlov’s Dogs and The Omega Dog.  And believe me, at the rate he’s going, there are going to be a lot of hits coming.

So, please, give up a big welcome for Thom Brannan and D.L. Snell, zombie masters.

Image 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Thom Brannan:  My first foray into writing all things zombie was ghostwriting the finale to Z.A. Recht’s Morningstar Strain trilogy, Survivors. Since then, I’ve been kind of fascinated by how a zombie apocalypse would change the status quo. Not in the now, of course… the apocalyptic factor tends to make shreds of the status quo. I mean, of the future us.  And like my Worthy Opponent, D.L. Snell, I very much like to see how the new kid on the horror block fares against established monsters, which led to Pavlov’s Dogs and The Omega Dog.

D.L. Snell:  Thanks for having me, Joe! Love your site, love your books.

I’ve written quite a bit of undead fiction since publishing my first zombie short story in 2005, titled “Limbless Bodies Swaying.” Most of my zombie work since then has centered around a “versus” concept: zombies vs. superheroes, zombies vs. vampires, and more recently in PAVLOV’S DOGS and THE OMEGA DOG, zombies vs. werewolves.

Seems cruel now, but as a kid I was fascinated with pitting bugs against each other in a coffee can: black widow vs. scorpion; ants vs. potato bug; ants vs. scorpion vs. potato bug… vs. rising water level. Sadly, none of these matchups escalated like I’d hoped. They were all… pretty lame. I feel the same way about movies with a versus theme, actually: they’re all so terribly B-rated.

So when I bring the versus concept to my zombie fiction, I strive to create stories that don’t simply cash in on the two monsters fighting in a coffee can. I like to throw humans in the middle and make the story more about them, more about their reactions and their actions and their emotions and their betrayals and alliances and their struggle to survive and to cope with the very act of surviving. Some of these people just happen to be able to turn into werewolves.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

TB:  Oh, heavens no. I’m not prepared for my microwave to fail, much less a zombie apocalypse. I think something like that would get its hooks into humanity pretty quickly. The news would be all over it, and like Peter Clines says, after the first announcements, you can pretty much assume any place with its own parking lot looted. There’s also denial. As a culture, we’re all about the ZA, but who in their right mind would believe it’s actually happening?

This is why the tale of the everyman survivor is fascinating. We’d like to believe we’re that guy (or gal, whichever) who doesn’t have a special skillset but somehow makes it through the collapse of everything. That’s why readers like Ken and Jorge in the two Dogs books, that’s why people identify with Jack, the main character in my other novel, Lords of Night.

DLS:  I am not prepared. Most people aren’t. I think our chance of winning depends a lot on the type of zombie—fast, slow, smart, brain-dead, or in the case of THE OMEGA DOG… shapeshifting. It also greatly depends on the type of infection. How does it spread? How fast does it spread? Where has it spread to already? Is it something we’re able to vaccinate or otherwise cure? In THE OMEGA DOG they find out the virus itself has become… a sort of shapeshifter. What are the ramifications of that?

Of course, our reaction to the outbreak will also help determine our fate. How fast can we quarantine it? If we can’t quarantine it, can we devise strategies to eradicate it? If we can’t eradicate it, can we “quarantine” ourselves on some island or farm, or in some hidey-hole? And in isolating ourselves, do we have the supplies and resources we need? Are the resources we have renewable? How long will the supplies last, and are we able to restock?

I do know the human race is incredibly robust. It can be extremely difficult to kill a person, and it’s even harder to kill off our entire race. Of course, we have weak spots, don’t we? Stab me in the heart or hit a major artery. Blow my brains out. Deprive me of water or air. Shift the poles on me.

But for all that, we’re resourceful, we’re hardy, and despite all our issues with communication and tolerance and selfishness, we do have the capacity to work together for the common good.  We’ve been doing it for hundreds of thousands of years. So I imagine we have a good shot at winning the war against zombies.

It just depends on whether or not they hit a weak spot.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

TB:  I might be in the minority, but Land of the Dead is one of my top zombie movies. It sits just behind Shaun of the Dead, I think. LotD is one of those that is what I said just a minute ago, a film that examines society at large after the ZA. It’s so close after that people are still clinging to money and power and status; the people at the top still manage to do nothing, while the people who really power the enclosed society, the workers, slog for little and get no recognition for it.

As for favorite zombie book, it’s either Jason S. Hornsby’s Every Sigh, the End, for it’s completely unconventional take on the why’s and wherefore’s of the ZA, or it’s Dave Dunwoody’s Empire duology, because that’s another example of what Land of the Dead does, only several hundred years in the future.

DLS:  Of course I have a lot of nostalgia for the classics, all the early Romero films. Joe, I absolutely loved your book APOCALYPSE OF THE DEAD. I was lucky enough to read an earlier draft of this, and I was floored. Here it was, the first truly great zombie epic. It reminded me of how books like THE STAND and SWAN SONG made me feel, and I loved it.

And THE WALKING DEAD, in my opinion, is probably one of the deepest zombie-themed stories you’ll find onscreen. I really do enjoy that show, and it’s mainly because of the characters and all the terrible suffering they endure. And the headshots. The headshots are great too.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

TB:  I’m not sure if this means people killed by zombies, or the other way around. Shit. Tell you what, I’m going to go with… Ash vs. Resurrected Evil Ash in Army of Darkness.

DLS:  WALKING DEAD fans who aren’t caught up, look away now, because I’ve never been so affected by the death of a zombie as I was by the deaths of Sophia and Merle.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

TB:  It’s fear. A lot of Americans don’t have the worries our forebears did. Technological and medical advancements have made life longer, injuries and conditions less life-threatening, and things more plentiful. What I think makes the zombie so fascinating to us at large is that anything we’re working on these days could be Frankenstein’s creature, coming back to do us in. Nanotechnology, custom-made viruses (virii?) or just our further understanding of all the things we do not understand in the universe. The more we learn, the less we know.

And like so many others have said, the zombie is us. I know I’m taking it out of context, but Corrosion of Conformity said it best in “Infinite War,” I think: become the enemy to defeat yourself.

Well, this was fun. Thanks for letting me spew nonsense here, Joe!

DLS:  A lot of different things. We’re afraid of destroying ourselves. We’re afraid of other people. We’re afraid of getting sick. We’re afraid of losing everyone and everything we’ve ever loved. We’re afraid of losing civilization and law and order and humanity itself. We’re afraid of what we’re capable of doing to survive—fearful of what we’ll become as a repercussion. Most of all, though, we’re afraid of death.

I once heard a wise man say our biggest, most destructive sin is greed. But to me greed is largely an exaggerated unwillingness to die. We want more, because more increases the likelihood we’ll survive. What is comfort if not freedom from danger and pain?

So in a major way I think zombies illustrate our ugly, vicious, selfish drive to keep on walking… even when everything that made us human has long ago died.

You can check out their books Pavlov’s Dogs and The Omega Dog here, Thom’s books here, and David’s books here.

Advertisements

Craig DiLouie

My guest today is a very dear friend, Mr. Craig DiLouie.  Craig and I go way back to the early days of Permuted Press, back when it was still being run out of Jacob Kier’s garage.  Since that time I’ve watched him hone his craft and become one of the premier thriller writers of our generation.  He’s tackled zombies with his books Tooth and Nail and The Infection.  He’s done the straight up psychological thriller with Paranoia.  He’s done military sci-fi comedy with The Great Planet Robbery, and his latest, Suffer the Children, nearly tore my heart out.  And in between all that he’s even managed to write several works of non-fiction on lighting and electrical design.  Talk about versatile!

But that’s Craig DiLouie.  When you read him, you get the sense that he can pretty much do anything.  I envy writers like him, so easy to read, so fertile of imagination.  He makes it look easy.

But here’s the thing about Craig.  He is totally sincere.  You cannot be in his presence long without realizing this.  He’s one of the good ones, and that’s the main reason I agreed to join with him and Stephen Knight (you can read my interview with Stephen Knight here) for an upcoming zombie novella project called THE RETREAT.  (You can check out Craig’s intro to that project here.)

But for now, please enjoy this interview with my good friend, Craig DiLouie!   

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Craig DiLouie:  Thanks for having me, Joe! I’m the author of the bestselling zombie novels TOOTH AND NAIL, THE INFECTION and THE KILLING FLOOR. These novels have garnered hundreds of positive reviews from authors like yourself, readers and magazines and websites such as FANGORIA, and they’ve been published in English, Spanish, French, German and Russian. My work differentiates itself from other novels in the field through its gritty realism, original concepts and extreme action. 

My new apocalyptic horror novel, SUFFER THE CHILDREN, is coming out from Simon & Schuster in March 2014. Later this year, I’ll be working with you and Stephen Knight on a new self-published series of novellas. (Check out Craig’s official announcement of that project here.) I also blog about all things apocalyptic horror at www.craigdilouie.com.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

CD:  It would depend on the type of zombie we’re talking about. The zombies in my stories run and infect through biting. In that type of situation, humanity would have a very hard time surviving. In that situation, the best way to prepare is to take a yoga class so you’re flexible enough to kiss your own ass goodbye.

As for me, I don’t have a bug-out bag or anything like that. My city just went through some major flooding that resulted in the evacuation of 10% of the population and jeopardized the reliability of power and water citywide, and I was faced with a lot of interesting decisions to ensure my family had everything it needed. While I haven’t gone all the way and prepared for apocalypse, I do believe it’s common sense to make sure you have everything your family would need to survive for a week on its own.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

CD:  My tastes as a reader and writer tend toward the epic. For me, the biggest turn-on about zombies isn’t the zombies, it’s the zeitgeist. It’s the apocalypse and how ordinary people respond to crisis and its impossible choices. It’s not the excitement of being the last man standing, it’s the horror of being forced to fight to survive when there might no longer be much to live for anymore.

As a reader and writer, I also prefer stories about people with zombies or some other apocalyptic threat, not the other way around. For me, character must come first. The reader must care about the survivors.

Some of my favorite stories are your zombie series, Joe, with its realistic depiction of how the police would deal with a zombie apocalypse; HATER by David Moody, with its mind-blowing twist, and RUN by Blake Crouch, which is sort of the American version of HATER; Adam Baker’s series, which offer brilliant thrillers; DUST by Joan Frances Turner; ONE by Conrad Williams; THE REAPERS ARE THE ANGELS by Alden Bell; ON THE THIRD DAY by Rhys Thomas; and HANDLING THE UNDEAD by John Ajvide Lindqvist. Man, I can remember standing in a bookstore ten years ago and seeing DEAD CITY and Brian Keene’s work and that was about it. Now there are tons of great choices for readers and opportunities for good writers.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

CD:  I loved the movie WORLD WAR Z, not really caring how closely tied it was to the book. The movie has an epic feel and is filled with amazing set pieces. Pretty much the entire film would qualify as my favorite zombie kill scene.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

CD:  I think the surge in interest in the zombie apocalypse has more to do with the apocalypse than zombies. In the 1950s, we had Martians, in the ’60s, dystopia, in the ’70s, environmental collapse, in the ’80s, nuclear war, in the ’90s, killer viruses, in the ’00s, zombies. Today, many people feel that things are getting worse and that there’s little they can do about it. Add in things like bird flu and global warming to the normal pressures of holding a job and paying the bills, and there’s a lot of angst in modern life. Reading zombie stories offers a dramatic release. By reading survival horror, people confront danger/death and survive it. By reading an apocalyptic story, they experience the catharsis of “throwing it all away” and the true horror of losing everything that matters to them. As for zombies, well, they’re just scary and fun. Not only has the world ended, but your former neighbors are hunting you. These are the levels of psychic engagement I look for as a reader and try to work into my stories as a writer—personal, in-your-face horror combined with the awe and titillation of the end of the world.

 

That was the one and only Craig DiLouie, ladies and gentlemen, perhaps the nicest guy you’re ever likely to meet.  I had a great time hanging with him in New Orleans, and I’m looking forward to the next time our paths cross.

Now that you’ve heard what he has to say about zombies, go check out his books.  Oh, and I strongly urge you to follow his blog.  He has developed some of the best content on any author-driven website out there.

David Dunwoody

With about a week to go before the September 3rd release of my next zombie novel, The Savage Dead, I’m going to start picking up the pace on these interviews.  This morning I posted my interview with S.G. Browne (you can check out that interview here) and now, for the evening crowd, I’m offering you one of my oldest friends in the genre, Mr. David Dunwoody.  Born in Texas and currently living in Utah, David writes subversive horror fiction, including the EMPIRE zombie series and the collections DARK ENTITIES and UNBOUND & OTHER TALES. Most recent is his post-apocalyptic novel THE HARVEST CYCLE. His short stories (and I am huge fan of David Dunwoody’s short fiction) have been or will be published by outfits such as Permuted, Chaosium, Shroud, Twisted Library, Belfire and Dark Regions. A few of his favorite authors include Lovecraft, King and Barker.

Image 

At the same time I was releasing my first novel, Dead City, David was serializing EMPIRE, the first book in his EMPIRE series online.  I remember following along with the story, completely engrossed in his story.  David has continued to keep me reading since then.  In fact, his short fiction (a healthy dose of which deals with the zombie in one form or another) has matured to a frightening level.  So much so in fact that I would now count him one of the horror genre’s best short story writers.  Don’t believe me?  Check out three of my favorites by him:  “The Reluctant Prometheus,” “Grinning Samuel,” and “Dead Man and the Sea.”  By the way, his website offers one of the most thorough and easy to use bibliographies I’ve ever seen on an author’s website.  Check that out here.

But for now, enjoy this conversation with one of horror’s most fertile imaginations!

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

David Dunwoody:  When it comes to zombies my only rule is that there are no rules. Well, I guess that isn’t quite true – they gotta be dead. But I wouldn’t begrudge anyone their own unique take. Romero’s ghoul is a brilliant monster archetype with endless potential. In my two Empire novels, I decided the best nemesis for the undead would be Death himself, so I pitted the Reaper against the zombies. There are traditional shambler-types and there are some weird-as-hell variants.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

DD:  I’d like to think that the optimism in World War Z’s (book not film) ending – a world where Man was brought to the brink of extinction, but there is still a lot of infrastructure and hope to rebuild – is grounded in reality. But I have to admit I’m a misanthrope and my faith in the collective human spirit is nil. Similarly, my preparedness is at a minimum. I have no family. I don’t want to live through a zompoc that isn’t ruled by my pen!

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

DD:  Paffenroth’s Dying to Live is my favorite novel, followed by WWZ. (Check out my earlier interview with Kim Paffenroth here.)  While neither skimps on the cynicism, both are very thoughtful and really champion the human spirit – kinda odd picks for a misanthrope! In film it’s a dead heat between Dawn of the Dead ’78 and Return of the Living Dead. I am in love with ROTLD’s punk sensibility, both in terms of style and its eagerness to explore all the different permutations of the undead condition. I think ROTLD really inspired me to write novels featuring different degrees and types of undead. When I think of zombie shorts I always think of McCammon’s Stoker-winning “Eat Me” from Skipp & Spector’s Book of the Dead. It’s a beautiful story and one example of how you can portray monster love without it being a teen melodrama or comedy.

Video game is the original Resident Evil. I’m a sucker for big spooky houses as much as I am zombies. Plus they throw in tons of crazy shit. Likely inspired the zombie shark in Empire.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

DD:  Awesome question. Though it’s not a badass visual, the unseen execution of Roger in Dawn does it for me. It really brings the whole concept of the zombie home when you see him suffer and die and then rise, and Peter knowing what he must do.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

DD:  One is that we are increasingly connected and more aware of ourselves as a community. The other is that, in spite of this, we are increasingly narcissistic.
The internet and the digital self have grown our egos like tumors.  While the thought of one’s lover or friend or child turning into an empty, hungry vessel is, I’m sure, a timeless horror, the appeal of the “They’re us” monster is a particular one. The zombie rose in the 20th century because it was time for that type of monster. One that expresses broad themes of xenophobia and fear of contagion but that is also us, each of us, without ceasing to be a monster.

The vampire and werewolf fill this role at times but I don’t think they started out that way, and besides today they are often self-parodies or the focus leans too far toward either human or monster. Zombies are balanced for our time.

That all said, for many storytellers I think it’s often the case that all this media connectivity makes them more conscious of us as a people. And so zombie stories examine common human nature, social constructs and crowd psychology. It may be that this broader perspective drives many storytellers while our self-absorption drives consumer appeal. And the thing is, you and I and a ton of zombie nuts are both fans and storytellers.
I can only conclude that this means we are the most healthy, balanced people on the planet. 

Check out David’s website here, and then go and read his stuff here!

Kim Paffenroth

When I released my first novel, Dead City, there were only a handful of zombie books out there.  Skipp and Goodfellow had done their Books of the Dead and Mondo Zombie, and Brian Keene had done The Rising, and Robert Kirkman was just getting The Walking Dead graphic novel series started.  If you were willing to search online you could find David Moody, J.L. Bourne and David Wellington serializing their first zombie efforts, but that was about it.  Dead City entered the market in 2006 to a hungry zombie readership, and readers devoured it.

But Dead City wasn’t alone.  That same year, zombie fans got another sweet treat in the form of Gospel of the Living Dead:  George Romero’s Visions of Hell on Earth, a probing analysis of the zombie films of George Romero.  The author of that book was Dr. Kim Paffenroth, professor of Religious Studies at Iona College in New York.  I was impressed with Dr. Paffenroth’s credentials, and when he contacted me and asked if I’d like to take a look at what he’d written, I jumped at the chance.

I was delighted with what I read, and I was delighted yet again when it won the Bram Stoker Award for Non-Fiction.

And then Kim contacted me and said he’d written a little zombie novel of his own, called Dying to Live, and asked if I’d like to read it for a possible cover blurb.  I said not just yes but hell yes, let me have a look.

I’m so glad I did, because Kim Paffenroth is a threat on all fronts.  Capable of writing non-fiction on everything from Augustine to zombies in a clear, readable style, he is also capable of writing fiction that probes deeply some of knottiest philosophical issues confronting the spiritual man living in today’s world.

I count myself lucky that Kim and I have maintained a steady correspondence over the years.  I have watched with great admiration as he’s grown as a fiction writer, and along the way we’ve shared moments of triumph and sorrow.  I count him a good friend, and one I’m proud to know.  I hope you enjoy this interview, because Kim Paffenroth is one of the truly good guys in this business.

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Kim Paffenroth:  I came at it from a different direction than most people. I started out writing nonfiction about zombies – not in the sense of “zombies are real” but I started by analyzing George Romero’s zombie films in a book, Gospel of the Living Dead: George Romero’s Visions of Hell on Earth (Baylor, 2006). It won the Bram Stoker Award and I got the idea to follow up with some zombie fiction of my own – instead of analyzing Romero’s zombies, I could give mine the symbolic significance I wanted.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

KP:  Oh I don’t think I’d make it very far. I think we’d probably “win” but as in the really great zombie films (Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead) and now in The Walking Dead, I think the question would be at what cost? We’ve seen how much freedom and privacy we’re willing to give up, post-9/11: what kind of violent, security state would we have if we were always under the threat of walking, cannibal corpses?

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

KP:  I’ll never forget the original Dawn of the Dead and the effect it had on my imagination, or even deeper elements of my being and values.  To me, it’s the perfect balance between survivalist fantasies of how to prepare and equip, but with a sense of how those things don’t matter, in the face of an existence that has no meaning or purpose.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

KP:  Again, it’s a corollary of seeing something when you’re at a particularly impressionable age. The helicopter partial decapitation in the original Dawn of the Dead is pretty hokey by modern standards, but I remember I could not get over that scene and “How did they do it?” You take a more spectacular kill in a more recent film (I like the bridge-severing in Land of the Dead) and you just can’t look at it the same way, it doesn’t fill you with wonder, because you’ve just come to expect really over the top and complicated and realistic looking scenes like that.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

KP:  I think the zombie may well survive and be re-imagined for future generations with different perspectives and contexts, but the way you frame the question does underline our current situation as a way of understanding the zombie phenomenon. And by “current situation” I don’t just mean “post-9/11”: that’s the challenge, to see the zombie as somehow responding to something that’s been with us since 1967. So in that sense, I’d say the zombie does embody all our fears of the decline of imperialist America, and the zombie can stand in for a myriad of fears associated with that gradual, painful, violent decline: Vietnam, consumerism, racism, the military-industrial complex, terrorism, the surveillance state, the class divide, colonialism, environmental degradation and catastrophe. 

You can check out Kim Paffenroth’s many books here, and check out his blog here

Publishing News – Quarantined to be Rereleased

Quite a few readers have asked me what’s going on with my second book, Quarantined.  Well, here’s the scoop.

My contract with Lachesis Publishing ran out on April 1st, and I’ve decided not to renew with them.  Lachesis is a good outfit, run by some wonderful people, but they’ve had some real difficulties dealing with distributors here in the U.S.  That’s made availability a problem, to the point that nearly all sales of the book over the last three years have come from Amazon.  Getting the title into the brick and mortar stores has been nearly impossible.

So, after some difficult decision making, I’ve decided to reposition the book with Permuted Press.  They will be doing an inexpensive ebook version that can be read on both the Kindle and the Nook, plus a trade paperback edition that I’m really looking forward to, as it will include a few technical revisions to bring the fight against the San Antonio Flu up to date.

Rollout will occur in two parts, with the ebook version appearing first.  Hopefully, the ebook version will be available within a few weeks.  The trade paperback edition is still waiting on new cover art and should be coming out sometime this summer.

I’ll have full details and exact release dates soon.  In the meantime, I’m told that the few remaining new copies of Quarantined are running for over a $100, with used copies going for over $50.

Great Zombie Website

I stop by this site from time to time to make sure I’m up to date on my zombie fiction.  This is one of the more comprehensive zombie fiction sites around, and almost everything has a short, helpful review attached.

Publishing News – Starvation Army

A while back I was in a Permuted Press anthology called History is Dead, edited by Kim Paffenroth.  I just got word today that my story in that anthology, “Starvation Army,” was selected by Ellen Datlow as an honorable mention in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror 2008.  I’m thrilled to get noticed.

Four other stories from the same anthology were recognized as honorable mentions, and I’m excited to be in such wonderful company.  Here’s the list of honorable mentions from History is Dead.

Jenny Ashford, “The Anatomy Lesson”
Doug Hutcheson, “The Travellin’ Show”
Carole Lanham, “The Moribund Room”
Joe McKinney, “Starvation Army”
Christine Morgan, “The Barrow Maid”

Publishing News: The Sixth Mission

I just got word that my short story, “The Sixth Mission,” was chosen for a new Best of anthology called Best New Tales of the Apocalypse, coming soon from Permuted Press.  I’m really excited about this one.  Permuted has been getting better and better over the last few years, and I’m honored to be a part of their family of writers.

“The Sixth Mission” was first published as an Amazon Short back in 2007.  It’s the story of five friends who have reunited for a funeral, only to discover that the secret they thought they had buried for good forty years earlier has come back.

More on this anthology as it develops.

%d bloggers like this: