Thom Brannan and D.L. Snell

Today I’m bringing you a bit of treat.  This is the first of two multi-author interviews, and I decided to make that pairing D.L. Snell and Thom Brannan, two writers who have managed to join their voices into a perfect chorus to form the Pavlov’s Dogs series, which features genetically engineered werewolves against zombies.  Having read the books in manuscript form I can tell you they are a high-octane thrill ride you do not want to miss.

Up first in our little round robin is author Thom Brannan.  Thom has got one of those man’s man kind of biographies that makes readers salivate over what insights he is going to give us in his fiction.  The man has been a submariner, a nuclear operator, an electrician, and has even worked on an offshore drilling platform.  Looking at this guy’s resume you just know he’s got a whole host of stories waiting in the wings.  He now lives in Austin (again, there’s that Texas and zombies thing; go figure!) with his wife, Kitty, a son and a daughter, and a cat and dog.  In other words, he’s a man with his hands full.

But he’s got another label to put into his biography, and that is literary detective.  You see, one of our most promising voices in zombie fiction, Mr. ZA. Recht, was taken from us way too soon. Recht left his Morningstar Trilogy unfinished and until Thom came along, it looked like it would never be finished.  But Thom, with the blessing of Recht’s family, friends and publisher, went through all of Recht’s notes and outlines and rough sketches and managed to create a thrilling conclusion to the series that had fans like me cheering his name.

But Thom has also worked on another amazing zombie novel with my other guest for today, Mr. D.L. Snell.  David and I go way back.  David was one of the first writers to comment on my novel Dead City, and shortly after his reviews came out online, I contacted him with a good old-fashioned thank you note.  We started trading emails, and a tight friendship grew from that.  I have cheered him through the many novels and short stories he’s published since, from Roses of Blood on Barbwire Vines to his recent works, Pavlov’s Dogs and The Omega Dog.  And believe me, at the rate he’s going, there are going to be a lot of hits coming.

So, please, give up a big welcome for Thom Brannan and D.L. Snell, zombie masters.

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Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Thom Brannan:  My first foray into writing all things zombie was ghostwriting the finale to Z.A. Recht’s Morningstar Strain trilogy, Survivors. Since then, I’ve been kind of fascinated by how a zombie apocalypse would change the status quo. Not in the now, of course… the apocalyptic factor tends to make shreds of the status quo. I mean, of the future us.  And like my Worthy Opponent, D.L. Snell, I very much like to see how the new kid on the horror block fares against established monsters, which led to Pavlov’s Dogs and The Omega Dog.

D.L. Snell:  Thanks for having me, Joe! Love your site, love your books.

I’ve written quite a bit of undead fiction since publishing my first zombie short story in 2005, titled “Limbless Bodies Swaying.” Most of my zombie work since then has centered around a “versus” concept: zombies vs. superheroes, zombies vs. vampires, and more recently in PAVLOV’S DOGS and THE OMEGA DOG, zombies vs. werewolves.

Seems cruel now, but as a kid I was fascinated with pitting bugs against each other in a coffee can: black widow vs. scorpion; ants vs. potato bug; ants vs. scorpion vs. potato bug… vs. rising water level. Sadly, none of these matchups escalated like I’d hoped. They were all… pretty lame. I feel the same way about movies with a versus theme, actually: they’re all so terribly B-rated.

So when I bring the versus concept to my zombie fiction, I strive to create stories that don’t simply cash in on the two monsters fighting in a coffee can. I like to throw humans in the middle and make the story more about them, more about their reactions and their actions and their emotions and their betrayals and alliances and their struggle to survive and to cope with the very act of surviving. Some of these people just happen to be able to turn into werewolves.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

TB:  Oh, heavens no. I’m not prepared for my microwave to fail, much less a zombie apocalypse. I think something like that would get its hooks into humanity pretty quickly. The news would be all over it, and like Peter Clines says, after the first announcements, you can pretty much assume any place with its own parking lot looted. There’s also denial. As a culture, we’re all about the ZA, but who in their right mind would believe it’s actually happening?

This is why the tale of the everyman survivor is fascinating. We’d like to believe we’re that guy (or gal, whichever) who doesn’t have a special skillset but somehow makes it through the collapse of everything. That’s why readers like Ken and Jorge in the two Dogs books, that’s why people identify with Jack, the main character in my other novel, Lords of Night.

DLS:  I am not prepared. Most people aren’t. I think our chance of winning depends a lot on the type of zombie—fast, slow, smart, brain-dead, or in the case of THE OMEGA DOG… shapeshifting. It also greatly depends on the type of infection. How does it spread? How fast does it spread? Where has it spread to already? Is it something we’re able to vaccinate or otherwise cure? In THE OMEGA DOG they find out the virus itself has become… a sort of shapeshifter. What are the ramifications of that?

Of course, our reaction to the outbreak will also help determine our fate. How fast can we quarantine it? If we can’t quarantine it, can we devise strategies to eradicate it? If we can’t eradicate it, can we “quarantine” ourselves on some island or farm, or in some hidey-hole? And in isolating ourselves, do we have the supplies and resources we need? Are the resources we have renewable? How long will the supplies last, and are we able to restock?

I do know the human race is incredibly robust. It can be extremely difficult to kill a person, and it’s even harder to kill off our entire race. Of course, we have weak spots, don’t we? Stab me in the heart or hit a major artery. Blow my brains out. Deprive me of water or air. Shift the poles on me.

But for all that, we’re resourceful, we’re hardy, and despite all our issues with communication and tolerance and selfishness, we do have the capacity to work together for the common good.  We’ve been doing it for hundreds of thousands of years. So I imagine we have a good shot at winning the war against zombies.

It just depends on whether or not they hit a weak spot.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

TB:  I might be in the minority, but Land of the Dead is one of my top zombie movies. It sits just behind Shaun of the Dead, I think. LotD is one of those that is what I said just a minute ago, a film that examines society at large after the ZA. It’s so close after that people are still clinging to money and power and status; the people at the top still manage to do nothing, while the people who really power the enclosed society, the workers, slog for little and get no recognition for it.

As for favorite zombie book, it’s either Jason S. Hornsby’s Every Sigh, the End, for it’s completely unconventional take on the why’s and wherefore’s of the ZA, or it’s Dave Dunwoody’s Empire duology, because that’s another example of what Land of the Dead does, only several hundred years in the future.

DLS:  Of course I have a lot of nostalgia for the classics, all the early Romero films. Joe, I absolutely loved your book APOCALYPSE OF THE DEAD. I was lucky enough to read an earlier draft of this, and I was floored. Here it was, the first truly great zombie epic. It reminded me of how books like THE STAND and SWAN SONG made me feel, and I loved it.

And THE WALKING DEAD, in my opinion, is probably one of the deepest zombie-themed stories you’ll find onscreen. I really do enjoy that show, and it’s mainly because of the characters and all the terrible suffering they endure. And the headshots. The headshots are great too.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

TB:  I’m not sure if this means people killed by zombies, or the other way around. Shit. Tell you what, I’m going to go with… Ash vs. Resurrected Evil Ash in Army of Darkness.

DLS:  WALKING DEAD fans who aren’t caught up, look away now, because I’ve never been so affected by the death of a zombie as I was by the deaths of Sophia and Merle.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

TB:  It’s fear. A lot of Americans don’t have the worries our forebears did. Technological and medical advancements have made life longer, injuries and conditions less life-threatening, and things more plentiful. What I think makes the zombie so fascinating to us at large is that anything we’re working on these days could be Frankenstein’s creature, coming back to do us in. Nanotechnology, custom-made viruses (virii?) or just our further understanding of all the things we do not understand in the universe. The more we learn, the less we know.

And like so many others have said, the zombie is us. I know I’m taking it out of context, but Corrosion of Conformity said it best in “Infinite War,” I think: become the enemy to defeat yourself.

Well, this was fun. Thanks for letting me spew nonsense here, Joe!

DLS:  A lot of different things. We’re afraid of destroying ourselves. We’re afraid of other people. We’re afraid of getting sick. We’re afraid of losing everyone and everything we’ve ever loved. We’re afraid of losing civilization and law and order and humanity itself. We’re afraid of what we’re capable of doing to survive—fearful of what we’ll become as a repercussion. Most of all, though, we’re afraid of death.

I once heard a wise man say our biggest, most destructive sin is greed. But to me greed is largely an exaggerated unwillingness to die. We want more, because more increases the likelihood we’ll survive. What is comfort if not freedom from danger and pain?

So in a major way I think zombies illustrate our ugly, vicious, selfish drive to keep on walking… even when everything that made us human has long ago died.

You can check out their books Pavlov’s Dogs and The Omega Dog here, Thom’s books here, and David’s books here.

Rachel Aukes

The Savage Dead is just a few days away now, and I figured I would celebrate by showing off my latest discovery in the zombie genre.  My guest today is Rachel Aukes, author of the absolutely brilliant 100 Days in Deadland.  I got a chance to read 100 Days earlier this month as part of an article series on new book marketing Rachel and I wrote together, and after reading Rachel’s book, I knew she had a place here.

Rachel writes speculative fiction to the tune of science fiction, dark fantasy and horror, and writes in those same genres, but with a romantic twist, under the pen name Berinn Rae.  Born and raised on a farm in Iowa, she boasted the biggest comic book collection in town.  She is a skilled pilot and dog lover, and managed to work both into 100 Days in wonderful ways.

She is one to watch, ladies and gentlemen.  But for now, take a moment and read what she has to say on zombies.  Then go out and buy her book!

The Savage Dead is just a few days away now, and I figured I would celebrate by showing off my latest discovery in the zombie genre.  My guest today is Rachel Aukes, author of the absolutely brilliant 100 Days in Deadland.  I got a chance to read 100 Days earlier this month as part of an article series on new book marketing Rachel and I wrote together, and after reading Rachel’s book, I knew she had a place here.

Rachel writes speculative fiction to the tune of science fiction, dark fantasy and horror, and writes in those same genres, but with a romantic twist, under the pen name Berinn Rae.  Born and raised on a farm in Iowa, she boasted the biggest comic book collection in town.  She is a skilled pilot and dog lover, and managed to work both into 100 Days in wonderful ways.

She is one to watch, ladies and gentlemen.  But for now, take a moment and read what she has to say on zombies.  Then go out and buy her book!

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Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Rachel Aukes:  Thanks for having me, Joe!

I’m one of the newbies here, with only one zombie novel out (more on the way!). When it comes to the genre, it’s simple: I write what I’d like to read. I want a story I could lose myself in, even if only for four hours. We’ve all read books like that. You know the one where you read, oblivious to running children and bored pets, until you finish the last sentence and just lean back and close the book with a sigh. Yeah, that’s the one.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

RA:  I’d survive only if I had plenty of luck and good friends on my side. I’m not nearly prepared enough for TEOTWAKI. I live in a Des Moines suburb (would love to move out to the country) and have nothing but a bug-out bag ready. I’m a pilot, so if I can get to a plane, I can get to a better location to ride out the apocalypse.

As for humanity, we’d fare poorly. I’m a realist and see how easily the world as we know it could collapse. Most wouldn’t survive. Morals and scruples would fall by the wayside. Civilization would fall back to a feudal system, and slavery would no doubt rear its ugly head again. But we’d survive and rebuild.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

RA:  I could really ramble here, so I’ll just shoot of my top three that come to mind:

The First Days by Rhiannon Frater. Jenni and Katie made me fall in love with the zombie genre all over again.

A tie between Dead City by Joe McKinney and The Remaining by D.J. Molles. Their characters are real: they make mistakes, injuries knock them down, and they struggle with what it means to be human in a post-apocalyptic world.

The Gathering Dead by Stephen Knight. Damn, the guy knows how to slam a visual into your head.

For TV, I’ll throw on The Walking Dead to the list. They must be doing something right because every time I tell myself they’re about to jump the shark, they pull me back in.

For movies, I enjoy the tongue-in-cheek humor of Shaun of the Dead. I can watch it over and over and still laugh. Please, Simon Pegg, make another zombie film (funny, serious, it doesn’t matter)!

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

RA:  I’d have to say my favorite is when Columbus kills the zombie clown in Zombieland. It’s a monumental kill because he finally overcomes his greatest fear (clowns), signifying that he’s reached the point in his life he can take on anything. Oh, and I hate clowns.

RA:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

As I mentioned above, our easy, comfortable lives are dependent on a fragile system (which we seemingly have no control over) that could fall down like a house of cards. Economics, environment, biology…all pose risks to our world. The news drills this message into our brains every day. Zombies give us an outlet to ask ourselves the tough question. What if shit hits the fan? What would you do? What should you do? Zombies give us a “safe” way of thinking about a real world that could be far scarier than any horror novel. 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Rachel Aukes:  Thanks for having me, Joe!

I’m one of the newbies here, with only one zombie novel out (more on the way!). When it comes to the genre, it’s simple: I write what I’d like to read. I want a story I could lose myself in, even if only for four hours. We’ve all read books like that. You know the one where you read, oblivious to running children and bored pets, until you finish the last sentence and just lean back and close the book with a sigh. Yeah, that’s the one.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

RA:  I’d survive only if I had plenty of luck and good friends on my side. I’m not nearly prepared enough for TEOTWAKI. I live in a Des Moines suburb (would love to move out to the country) and have nothing but a bug-out bag ready. I’m a pilot, so if I can get to a plane, I can get to a better location to ride out the apocalypse.

As for humanity, we’d fare poorly. I’m a realist and see how easily the world as we know it could collapse. Most wouldn’t survive. Morals and scruples would fall by the wayside. Civilization would fall back to a feudal system, and slavery would no doubt rear its ugly head again. But we’d survive and rebuild.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

RA:  I could really ramble here, so I’ll just shoot of my top three that come to mind:

The First Days by Rhiannon Frater. Jenni and Katie made me fall in love with the zombie genre all over again.

A tie between Dead City by Joe McKinney and The Remaining by D.J. Molles. Their characters are real: they make mistakes, injuries knock them down, and they struggle with what it means to be human in a post-apocalyptic world.

The Gathering Dead by Stephen Knight. Damn, the guy knows how to slam a visual into your head.

For TV, I’ll throw on The Walking Dead to the list. They must be doing something right because every time I tell myself they’re about to jump the shark, they pull me back in.

For movies, I enjoy the tongue-in-cheek humor of Shaun of the Dead. I can watch it over and over and still laugh. Please, Simon Pegg, make another zombie film (funny, serious, it doesn’t matter)!

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

RA:  I’d have to say my favorite is when Columbus kills the zombie clown in Zombieland. It’s a monumental kill because he finally overcomes his greatest fear (clowns), signifying that he’s reached the point in his life he can take on anything. Oh, and I hate clowns.

RA:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

As I mentioned above, our easy, comfortable lives are dependent on a fragile system (which we seemingly have no control over) that could fall down like a house of cards. Economics, environment, biology…all pose risks to our world. The news drills this message into our brains every day. Zombies give us an outlet to ask ourselves the tough question. What if shit hits the fan? What would you do? What should you do? Zombies give us a “safe” way of thinking about a real world that could be far scarier than any horror novel. 

Max Booth III

Max Booth III is the author of four books: Toxicity (Post Mortem Press, 2014), a black comedy crime novel; The Mind is a Razorblade (Kraken Press, 2014), a neo-noir horror novel; and two story collections, True Stories Told By a Liar (Numen Books, 2012) and They Might Be Demons (Dark Moon Books, 2013). He is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing.  Since 2011 he has been the Assistant Editor of Dark Moon Digest, where I first got a chance to work with him on my zombie short story, “Bury My Heart in Marvin Gardens,” and has edited four anthologies: Zombie Jesus and Other True Stories (Dark Moon Books, 2012), Zombies Need Love, Too (Dark Moon Books, 2013), So it Goes: a Tribute to Kurt Vonnegut (Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing, 2013), and Long Distance Drunks: a Tribute to Charles Bukowski (Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing, 2014).  He has worked as a cashier, merchandise manager, inventory control specialist, copy editor, and hotel night manager. He currently lives in San Antonio, Texas with his life partner and dachshund.

As a San Antonio native, Max is of course part of the whole Texas thing going in the zombie genre.  (Readers of this series of interviews will probably know what I’m talking about, especially after my interviews with Rhiannon Frater, Bowie Ibarra, and Stephen Knight.)  His previous efforts on the zombie front have been as editor and short story writer, but he has recently penned a longer work called Black that has earned him a place among the zombie masters in this series.

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So please welcome Max Booth!

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Max Booth III:  Thanks for having me, Joe. It’s an honor to be here. I’ve written a few zombie short stories here and there—most notable, probably, would be my short story, “In the Attic of the Universe,” which was published by Post Mortem Press in their New Dawn Fades anthology back in 2011. It tells the story of a father living in the attic of his house with his infant child during the beginning of a zombie apocalypse. The undead practically surround his house, but he’s still lucky enough to slip out a few times to make food raids at various stores. On one of these grocery trips, however, he is bitten. So now this guy is infected with the zombie virus but he also has this infant child in his care. There’s no one else that can take him. If this guy dies, which is inevitable, then the baby also dies. The only question is, does he allow the baby to live long enough to be eaten by his own father, or does he end the child’s misery before it’s too late?

Another notable zombie story of mine is a novella called Black, and it will be published this October by Hazardous Press. It is a western story about a gunslinger who, no matter how hard he tries, just cannot die.

I like to approach my zombie writing with the zombies not being the main focus. I find the humans and their survival entirely more interesting than the disgusting walking meatbags trying to eat them.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

MB:  If we’re talking slow, Night of the Living Dead zombies, there’s no doubt in my mind that we’ll win. For one, our military is just way too powerful at this point, and two, everyone and their mother is prepared for the zombies to rise. They won’t last five minutes before we start blowing out their brains. I think, in a way, we sort of want that to happen. Because, deep down, we are all lunatics.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

MB:  Movie: 28 Days Later. Whenever I say this is my favorite zombie movie, there’s always a 50% chance that I am going to get punched in the face afterward. Some people go nuts when others recognize 28 Days Later as a zombie film, and I find that fact completely hilarious. But regardless, 28 Days Later was a damn good horror flick about zombies. No, they weren’t traditional zombies. But so what? Fiction is about being creative, trying something new. Coming up with different approaches. And that’s exactly what 28 Days Later was. Something new, and it was awesome.

Book: The Reapers Are the Angels by Alden Bell. This book is beautiful, absolutely beautiful. It is intense, brutal, and so damn mesmerizing. Imagine what would happen if Cormac McCarthy wrote a zombie novel, and you get The Reapers Are the Angels.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

MB:  Easy. The lawnmower scene from Peter Jackson’s Dead Alive. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RC1d7dw24Gg

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

MB:  Sometimes I wonder if our zombie obsession is just us daydreaming about a world where we can straight up murder people without consequence. But that thought is ridiculous and terrifying, so let’s just say…uh…consumerism!

That was Max Booth III ladies and gentlemen.  Check him out on Twitter at @GiveMeYourTeeth and on the web at http://www.TalesFromTheBooth.com.

 

John L. Campbell

John L. Campbell is the Amazon Horror bestselling author of Omega Days, as well as two collections of short stories, and The Mangroves, a novella of World War II terror.  An Active Member of the Horror Writer’s Association, Campbell’s work has appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines, and he is currently working on the next novel in his zombie apocalypse series.  He lives in the New York area with his family.

ImageI was lucky enough to get an opportunity to review his zombie thriller, Omega Days, for its upcoming 2014 release from Berkley/Penguin and I just knew I had to have him in this series.  Check Omega Days out when it’s released, and then look for its sequel, Ship of the Dead.  You won’t be disappointed.

You can visit John at www.johnlcampbell.com.  But for now, enjoy what he has to say about zombies and the apocalypse.

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

John L. Campbell:  First off, thanks for having me.  It’s great to be here.

I want to tell a compelling story.  I frequently remind myself that zombie readers aren’t just about zombies, they’re readers, and readers want a satisfying tale populated with characters they care about, whether they’re heroes or villains.  Next I try to give zombie aficionados what they’re looking for; immersion in an apocalyptic setting filled with as many “dead moments” as I can muster (there’s a lot of zombie fiction out there which is oddly short on zombies, and I think that frustrates zombophiles.)  I love presenting up-close and juicy encounters, but I also go for the wider scenes, the big Cecil B. DeMille productions with casts of thousands, hoping to stagger the reader under the full impact of the undead taking over a world which was once ours.  Finally, I have to like the story, or it won’t move beyond the jump drive.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

JC:  A food stockpile courtesy of a wholesale club, a full fuel oil tank, a house on remote property and a tidy little arsenal… I’d probably make it until a sushi craving drove me out into the arms of the horde.  As for humanity, I think the zombies would take the lion’s share, disease and failing infrastructure most of the rest.  A fraction of us would survive, provided we could learn (quickly!) to take responsibility for ourselves and not sit around waiting to be saved.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

JC:  Dawn of the Dead. 1978, hit me hard in my early teens.  It was the first “modern” zombie flick I had seen, and I was thrilled with the concept of self-reliance through firepower, and killing bad guys without consequence.  Especially since they were slow, and as long as you were smart, you could stay alive.  It’s still my favorite zombie movie.

Favorite book; the 1989 anthology Book of the Dead.  John Skipp and Craig Spector assembled the short story talents of King, McCammon, Ramsey Campbell and others, had George R. Romero pen the forward, and turned the zombies loose.  Perhaps what resonated most for me, and still does with today’s zombie short fiction, was the rich, seemingly endless variety of approaches to the same topic.  What could be better than hearing someone else’s opinion on a subject you love?

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

JC:  I’m split on this.  The helicopter blades taking off the top of the zombie’s head in the original Dawn of the Dead was hokey and wonderful.  In Season 2 of The Walking Dead, the “Stab-the-Zombie’s-Brain-through-the-Eye-with-a-Windshield-Wiper-Handle,” after it pushes its face through the glass, is a memorable kill.  There’s just something about that level of determination to get at prey, even as your face is peeled away.  That impresses me.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

JC:  We’re not really challenged as a society anymore, and I see our once-competitive nature fading.  Everyone is a winner, no one can be made to feel uncomfortable under any circumstances, and our lives are just a click away.  There’s no need to ever leave the couch.  Zombie fiction presents a very specific challenge to the everyday person; What would you do if…?  That’s the attraction at the core of the genre.  When a reader leaves a comment on a story along the lines of, “Your character was stupid…he wouldn’t have done that,” it makes me smile, because I know I’ve done my job.  What the reader is really saying is that in those circumstances, he wouldn’t have done that, and this means they became so engaged that they put themselves into the story.  That’s a win, and that’s why the genre is so popular.  It gives the average person the chance to think about what life would be like off the couch…fighting zombies.

Check out all of John’s books here.

Craig DiLouie

My guest today is a very dear friend, Mr. Craig DiLouie.  Craig and I go way back to the early days of Permuted Press, back when it was still being run out of Jacob Kier’s garage.  Since that time I’ve watched him hone his craft and become one of the premier thriller writers of our generation.  He’s tackled zombies with his books Tooth and Nail and The Infection.  He’s done the straight up psychological thriller with Paranoia.  He’s done military sci-fi comedy with The Great Planet Robbery, and his latest, Suffer the Children, nearly tore my heart out.  And in between all that he’s even managed to write several works of non-fiction on lighting and electrical design.  Talk about versatile!

But that’s Craig DiLouie.  When you read him, you get the sense that he can pretty much do anything.  I envy writers like him, so easy to read, so fertile of imagination.  He makes it look easy.

But here’s the thing about Craig.  He is totally sincere.  You cannot be in his presence long without realizing this.  He’s one of the good ones, and that’s the main reason I agreed to join with him and Stephen Knight (you can read my interview with Stephen Knight here) for an upcoming zombie novella project called THE RETREAT.  (You can check out Craig’s intro to that project here.)

But for now, please enjoy this interview with my good friend, Craig DiLouie!   

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Craig DiLouie:  Thanks for having me, Joe! I’m the author of the bestselling zombie novels TOOTH AND NAIL, THE INFECTION and THE KILLING FLOOR. These novels have garnered hundreds of positive reviews from authors like yourself, readers and magazines and websites such as FANGORIA, and they’ve been published in English, Spanish, French, German and Russian. My work differentiates itself from other novels in the field through its gritty realism, original concepts and extreme action. 

My new apocalyptic horror novel, SUFFER THE CHILDREN, is coming out from Simon & Schuster in March 2014. Later this year, I’ll be working with you and Stephen Knight on a new self-published series of novellas. (Check out Craig’s official announcement of that project here.) I also blog about all things apocalyptic horror at www.craigdilouie.com.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

CD:  It would depend on the type of zombie we’re talking about. The zombies in my stories run and infect through biting. In that type of situation, humanity would have a very hard time surviving. In that situation, the best way to prepare is to take a yoga class so you’re flexible enough to kiss your own ass goodbye.

As for me, I don’t have a bug-out bag or anything like that. My city just went through some major flooding that resulted in the evacuation of 10% of the population and jeopardized the reliability of power and water citywide, and I was faced with a lot of interesting decisions to ensure my family had everything it needed. While I haven’t gone all the way and prepared for apocalypse, I do believe it’s common sense to make sure you have everything your family would need to survive for a week on its own.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

CD:  My tastes as a reader and writer tend toward the epic. For me, the biggest turn-on about zombies isn’t the zombies, it’s the zeitgeist. It’s the apocalypse and how ordinary people respond to crisis and its impossible choices. It’s not the excitement of being the last man standing, it’s the horror of being forced to fight to survive when there might no longer be much to live for anymore.

As a reader and writer, I also prefer stories about people with zombies or some other apocalyptic threat, not the other way around. For me, character must come first. The reader must care about the survivors.

Some of my favorite stories are your zombie series, Joe, with its realistic depiction of how the police would deal with a zombie apocalypse; HATER by David Moody, with its mind-blowing twist, and RUN by Blake Crouch, which is sort of the American version of HATER; Adam Baker’s series, which offer brilliant thrillers; DUST by Joan Frances Turner; ONE by Conrad Williams; THE REAPERS ARE THE ANGELS by Alden Bell; ON THE THIRD DAY by Rhys Thomas; and HANDLING THE UNDEAD by John Ajvide Lindqvist. Man, I can remember standing in a bookstore ten years ago and seeing DEAD CITY and Brian Keene’s work and that was about it. Now there are tons of great choices for readers and opportunities for good writers.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

CD:  I loved the movie WORLD WAR Z, not really caring how closely tied it was to the book. The movie has an epic feel and is filled with amazing set pieces. Pretty much the entire film would qualify as my favorite zombie kill scene.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

CD:  I think the surge in interest in the zombie apocalypse has more to do with the apocalypse than zombies. In the 1950s, we had Martians, in the ’60s, dystopia, in the ’70s, environmental collapse, in the ’80s, nuclear war, in the ’90s, killer viruses, in the ’00s, zombies. Today, many people feel that things are getting worse and that there’s little they can do about it. Add in things like bird flu and global warming to the normal pressures of holding a job and paying the bills, and there’s a lot of angst in modern life. Reading zombie stories offers a dramatic release. By reading survival horror, people confront danger/death and survive it. By reading an apocalyptic story, they experience the catharsis of “throwing it all away” and the true horror of losing everything that matters to them. As for zombies, well, they’re just scary and fun. Not only has the world ended, but your former neighbors are hunting you. These are the levels of psychic engagement I look for as a reader and try to work into my stories as a writer—personal, in-your-face horror combined with the awe and titillation of the end of the world.

 

That was the one and only Craig DiLouie, ladies and gentlemen, perhaps the nicest guy you’re ever likely to meet.  I had a great time hanging with him in New Orleans, and I’m looking forward to the next time our paths cross.

Now that you’ve heard what he has to say about zombies, go check out his books.  Oh, and I strongly urge you to follow his blog.  He has developed some of the best content on any author-driven website out there.

Patrick Freivald

In my day job I’m a patrol supervisor for the San Antonio Police Department, and my duties sometimes carry me through a remote part of the west side of San Antonio.  The area is in marked contrast to the rest of the west side, which is a dense hive of businesses and older, and mostly low-income neighborhoods.  But the area I’m talking about is a wide expanse of farmland, and it’s absolutely beautiful, especially in the evening when the sun casts long shadows over the onion fields and darkness pools in between the rows of the pear tree orchards.

I mention all this because in the center of one of those onion fields is a large oak tree, several hundred years old, and beneath that tree is a small apiary.  You have to know it’s there to spot it, and I suspect most people who pass that way never even notice it.  But I do, and every time I pass it by I can’t help but think of today’s guest, Mr. Patrick Freivald.

Patrick has to have one of the most interesting biographies of any horror writer working today.  He’s a teacher who specializes in robotics, physics, and American Sign Language.  He also coaches an award winning robotics teams.  All of that is pretty freaking cool, to be sure, but on top of everything else, he raises bees.  I read from time to time on Facebook of his honey haul, and my mouth starts watering.

And you know, I haven’t even gotten to the part where I talk about what an amazing writer he is.  His books Twice Shy and Special Dead are absolutely fascinating takes on the zombie genre, and demonstrate, to my mind any way, an empathy for the teenage condition rarely found in fiction.

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This guy has got both sides of his brain working overtime, and I guarantee you he’s a name you’ll be hearing a lot more from in the coming years.

So, here he is, Patrick Freivald!

 

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Patrick Freivald:  I like to turn it on its head. There are a lot of stories out there that fall into one of two types: (a) the apocalypse is happening and people are trying to survive, and (b) the apocalypse has happened, and in the dystopian future people are trying to survive. I wanted to write about a world where zombies exist, have destroyed swaths of humanity, but outside of those areas of destruction, life has continued in an almost normal manner. It’s a bit like a tsunami or earthquake that destroys one region while the rest of the world just keeps on truckin’. The details of the rest of the world interest me.

My published zombie fiction details the life of an ordinary high school junior whose controlling mother has forced her to join the emo crowd because their fashion sense covers up the fact that she’s a zombie. (Ritalin-like injections give her the ability to resist the urge to eat her friends… mostly.) I wanted to be true to the tropes of the genre while at the same time turning them on their head, and to juxtapose the normalcy of ho-hum life with the absolute, chilling terror of the walking dead.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

PF:  Am I prepared? Probably. I live in the middle of blissful nowhere, with a huge garden, limitless fresh water, and great lines of sight. The Redhead(tm) and I live out of the garden all summer, and can what we don’t eat fresh so we can eat all winter, too, and there are loads and loads of deer (not to mention rabbits, squirrels, etc, etc.) Being a beekeeper, I have access to near-unlimited calories, as well as the wherewithal to make alcohol (for sterilization or consumption), vinegar, candles, and medicine. It wasn’t on purpose, but I’ve ended up in an area particularly suited to surviving the end of the world as we know it. Now if we can only survive Washington, D.C….

Would humanity win? That’s hard to answer, because there are many types of trope-fitting apocalypses. (Apocalypti?)

Slow zombies: Yes, at least in first world countries. I have no doubt that the modern military could and would contain outbreaks with brutal efficiency. We might lose towns, neighborhoods, maybe even entire cities before we get a handle on the situation, but we’d contain and destroy them. (If everyone who dies becomes one regardless, that’s more problematic, but not that big of a deal. New social norms could all but eliminate the problem side of that arrangement.)

Fast zombies: Same answer, with more losses.

David Moody-style plague: No. With just about everyone dead before the zombies even rise, humanity would drop below population viability even without counting the ravening hordes of violent, hungry dead people.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

PF:  Oooh, mean question. I love the unique-but-still-faithful-to-the-tropes nature of the Autumn series by David Moody. Jonathan Maberry’s Dead of Night is fantastic for its portrayal of zombies that are aware of everything they do, but can’t control themselves–perhaps one of the most chilling ideas I can imagine. I enjoyed the heck out of your own novella, The Crossing, for a great taste of the interaction between Free America and the Quarantine Zone, and because it dances around both major types of zombie stories. For sheer frolicking good fun, you can’t go wrong with the zombies-and-superheroes action of Ex-Heroes and Ex-Patriots by Peter Clines.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

PF:  It has to be the rooftop shootings in the Dawn of the Dead remake. The pairing of what should be a terrible and inhuman activity with a party-like atmosphere marries so perfectly with Down with the Sickness as covered by Richard Cheese that I can’t help but love it. Paired with the fantastic Johnny Cash opening credits, they make for two of the best montages in zombie history.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

PF:  Zombies are interesting because they carry with them a moral ambiguity that you can’t shake. The allegory can run all over the place–from decaying inner cities to sweatshop-driven commercialism to nanny-state totalitarianism to terrorism–but the fundamentals of the modern zombie require us to consider that yes, they may be dead, but they were and perhaps are human. They may be trying to eat your face or your children, but they were once a person with human dignity, with hopes and dreams and loved ones, and in destroying them we destroy a part of ourselves. Even if we have no choice.

 

Patrick is one of my favorites in the genre, and I strongly urge you to check out his books here.  Then go here to read his blog, where he’s putting on a blog series of his own in which he demonstrates a mastery of editing skill. 

Oh, and don’t forget, while you’re picking up some of Patrick’s books, make sure and pre-order your copy of my next zombie novel, The Savage Dead.

Roger Ma

I’m excited to bring you today’s guest on my countdown to the release of my upcoming zombie novel, The Savage Dead, because Roger Ma is a total badass.  I mean a real life badass.  As in he could tie you into a pretzel before you knew how truly screwed you really were.  What’s more, he’s turned his rather considerable real life fighting skills into one of the most valuable zombie books ever published, The Zombie Combat Manual.  Roger Ma specializes in hand-to-hand combat against the undead. He is the author of The Zombie Combat Manual: A Guide to Fighting the Living Dead. His new book, The Vampire Combat Manual: A Guide to Fighting the Bloodthirsty Undead, focuses on surviving an attack from a hunting succubus. He is the founder of the Zombie Combat Club and the Vampire Combat Club, organizations that focus on battling the undead without the aid of a firearm. He was recently featured as a zombie expert on the History Channel documentary “Zombies: A Living History.” He currently trains in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

I first met Roger in Long Island back in 2011.  We were on a zombie panel together (along with Jonathan Maberry, Scott Kenemore, and S.G. Browne) and it was probably the best zombie panel on which I’ve ever served.  Just look at us!

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(The panel, left to right:  Joe McKinney, Jonathan Maberry, S.G. Browne, Roger Ma, Scott Kenemore.)

Check out what Roger has to say about zombies, and then go check out the Zombie Combat Club online.  It’s a great site.

But first, meet Roger Ma, zombie ass kicker extraordinaire!

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre? 

Roger Ma:  Thanks for having me, Joe!  When it comes to the genre, I’m very much a traditionalist, in the sense that I adhere very closely to the Romero canon – shambling, formerly human creatures that want to devour your flesh, not just your “brains.”  When it came to writing about the living dead, I wanted to combine my love of the martial arts and hand-to-hand combat with zombies.  Living in New York City, I was never much of a “gun guy.”  And what do they tell you to do when you encounter a zombie?  “Shoot them in the head.”  So I thought, “Well, what if I don’t have a firearm?  What if you run out of ammunition?  What if I need to keep silent?”  That’s how The Zombie Combat Manual was born.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

RM:  It depends.  As far as humanity winning, it depends on how quickly everyone, state, federal, and local governments, recognize the situation and address it immediately.  If we do that, we’ve got a good chance.  If we don’t, we don’t.  As far as myself, it also depends.  I’m in fairly good cardiovascular shape, specifically out of my fear of needing to trek miles on foot in order to escape a threat, undead or otherwise.  However, I also live in one of the largest metropolitans in the world, so if this start here, it will be hell on earth trying to get out, literally.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

RM:  My favorite zombie media are the ones that introduced me into the genre.  For movies, it was Romero’s “Dawn of the Dead.”  My father took me to see it in the theaters when it was released.  I was 8 years old.  I haven’t been the same since.   Ever since then, at least several times a year, I’ll dream that I’m in a mall that’s teeming with zombies.  It’s a dream that I both love and loathe.  For zombie books, again, the book that introduced me to the literary zombie genre was John Skipp’s short story anthology “Book of the Dead.”  I remember seeing it in Forbidden Planet in Greenwich Village as a kid, and thought “people actually write stories about zombies, too?”  In fact, chatting about it with you makes me want to pick it up and read it again.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

RM:  Wow, just one?  That’s really tough.  If I were to pick just one, I would probably have to revert back to “Dawn.”  The scene where the zombie is climbing over the crates to get at Stephen as he fills the helicopter with fuel, and the rotor blades slice off the top of the zombie’s head.  I remember seeing that in the theater and going mental.  What’s great about it also is that Stephen doesn’t have to do a thing – the undead leads itself to its own demise.  Smart and energy efficient.   That’s one of the points I try to stress in my book and when I talk to people about the best “zombie weapons.”  The best weapons are those that require you to exert zero energy while still accomplishing the task at hand.  Sure, you can crush a bunch of zombie skulls with a crowbar or impale their brains with a katana, but how long before your energy levels give out, and then what do you do?  Wouldn’t it be better to have them walk off a building’s ledge trying to get at you?  People sometimes forget about practicality and want to go in beast mode.   That works until you gas out, which we all will do against an opponent that doesn’t tire.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

RM:  The zombie genre is one of the most malleable when it comes to subtext, we all know that.  It can represent consumerism and hive mentality, like in Romero’s work, and it can also represent one of many different fears.   Fear of death, disease, aging, plague, anarchy, that’s pretty obvious.   What’s not so obvious is what we represent in the undead scenario.  It’s my belief that if there’s one thing that we as a society are feeling now more than ever, it’s a lack of control.  I know that there are times when I myself feel like I’m barely able to process everything that’s going on around me, and that I’m holding things together by bare threads.  There’s also this feeling that whatever we do, however well we study, plan, and prepare, we are at the mercy of powerful forces that have a grip over society, be it financial, governmental or cultural, and that its sheer luck that we continue to plod along unscathed.  “There but the grace of God…” and all that. 

The zombie enables us, to a certain extent, to take that control back.  To be the hero.  Very few other genres, particular in horror, enable you to do that.  You’re not going to go toe-to-toe with an Ancient One, alien, or a spectre.  You can with the zombie, and that is incredibly empowering.  It’s like that old joke about the two guys who encounter a bear in the woods.  You don’t need to be faster than the bear; you just need to be faster than the other guy. 

Check out Roger Ma’s books here, and while you’re there, don’t forget to pre-order your copy of The Savage Dead.

David Dunwoody

With about a week to go before the September 3rd release of my next zombie novel, The Savage Dead, I’m going to start picking up the pace on these interviews.  This morning I posted my interview with S.G. Browne (you can check out that interview here) and now, for the evening crowd, I’m offering you one of my oldest friends in the genre, Mr. David Dunwoody.  Born in Texas and currently living in Utah, David writes subversive horror fiction, including the EMPIRE zombie series and the collections DARK ENTITIES and UNBOUND & OTHER TALES. Most recent is his post-apocalyptic novel THE HARVEST CYCLE. His short stories (and I am huge fan of David Dunwoody’s short fiction) have been or will be published by outfits such as Permuted, Chaosium, Shroud, Twisted Library, Belfire and Dark Regions. A few of his favorite authors include Lovecraft, King and Barker.

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At the same time I was releasing my first novel, Dead City, David was serializing EMPIRE, the first book in his EMPIRE series online.  I remember following along with the story, completely engrossed in his story.  David has continued to keep me reading since then.  In fact, his short fiction (a healthy dose of which deals with the zombie in one form or another) has matured to a frightening level.  So much so in fact that I would now count him one of the horror genre’s best short story writers.  Don’t believe me?  Check out three of my favorites by him:  “The Reluctant Prometheus,” “Grinning Samuel,” and “Dead Man and the Sea.”  By the way, his website offers one of the most thorough and easy to use bibliographies I’ve ever seen on an author’s website.  Check that out here.

But for now, enjoy this conversation with one of horror’s most fertile imaginations!

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

David Dunwoody:  When it comes to zombies my only rule is that there are no rules. Well, I guess that isn’t quite true – they gotta be dead. But I wouldn’t begrudge anyone their own unique take. Romero’s ghoul is a brilliant monster archetype with endless potential. In my two Empire novels, I decided the best nemesis for the undead would be Death himself, so I pitted the Reaper against the zombies. There are traditional shambler-types and there are some weird-as-hell variants.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

DD:  I’d like to think that the optimism in World War Z’s (book not film) ending – a world where Man was brought to the brink of extinction, but there is still a lot of infrastructure and hope to rebuild – is grounded in reality. But I have to admit I’m a misanthrope and my faith in the collective human spirit is nil. Similarly, my preparedness is at a minimum. I have no family. I don’t want to live through a zompoc that isn’t ruled by my pen!

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

DD:  Paffenroth’s Dying to Live is my favorite novel, followed by WWZ. (Check out my earlier interview with Kim Paffenroth here.)  While neither skimps on the cynicism, both are very thoughtful and really champion the human spirit – kinda odd picks for a misanthrope! In film it’s a dead heat between Dawn of the Dead ’78 and Return of the Living Dead. I am in love with ROTLD’s punk sensibility, both in terms of style and its eagerness to explore all the different permutations of the undead condition. I think ROTLD really inspired me to write novels featuring different degrees and types of undead. When I think of zombie shorts I always think of McCammon’s Stoker-winning “Eat Me” from Skipp & Spector’s Book of the Dead. It’s a beautiful story and one example of how you can portray monster love without it being a teen melodrama or comedy.

Video game is the original Resident Evil. I’m a sucker for big spooky houses as much as I am zombies. Plus they throw in tons of crazy shit. Likely inspired the zombie shark in Empire.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

DD:  Awesome question. Though it’s not a badass visual, the unseen execution of Roger in Dawn does it for me. It really brings the whole concept of the zombie home when you see him suffer and die and then rise, and Peter knowing what he must do.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

DD:  One is that we are increasingly connected and more aware of ourselves as a community. The other is that, in spite of this, we are increasingly narcissistic.
The internet and the digital self have grown our egos like tumors.  While the thought of one’s lover or friend or child turning into an empty, hungry vessel is, I’m sure, a timeless horror, the appeal of the “They’re us” monster is a particular one. The zombie rose in the 20th century because it was time for that type of monster. One that expresses broad themes of xenophobia and fear of contagion but that is also us, each of us, without ceasing to be a monster.

The vampire and werewolf fill this role at times but I don’t think they started out that way, and besides today they are often self-parodies or the focus leans too far toward either human or monster. Zombies are balanced for our time.

That all said, for many storytellers I think it’s often the case that all this media connectivity makes them more conscious of us as a people. And so zombie stories examine common human nature, social constructs and crowd psychology. It may be that this broader perspective drives many storytellers while our self-absorption drives consumer appeal. And the thing is, you and I and a ton of zombie nuts are both fans and storytellers.
I can only conclude that this means we are the most healthy, balanced people on the planet. 

Check out David’s website here, and then go and read his stuff here!

S.G. Browne

There was a time, for about three years or so after the publication of my first novel, Dead City, that I could sincerely claim to have seen every zombie movie ever made and read every zombie novel published in English.  Since that time the genre has grown so large that even the most hardened zombie fan would be hard pressed to make that claim.  But for a while it was true for me.  And for me, one of my favorite early discoveries came in the summer of 2009 with a wonderfully inventive and darkly funny novel called Breathers.

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I’ll be honest.  What stood about the book was not the title, or the clever and interesting description of the story, but simply the author’s last name.  Browne.  Spelled with an “e” at the end.  One of my favorite writers is a man named Sir Thomas Browne, a contemporary of Shakespeare.  Sir Thomas Browne wrote very learnedly and objectively about the many terrors of the night, and I still from time to time go back to his monographs on those terrors for inspiration.  And here was a zombie writer who shared the same spelling of the name.  It was a foolish thing to latch onto, but I believe life is full of such foolish coincidences, and the wise person learns to take note.  So I moved Breathers to the top of my To Be Read Pile and have been a Scott G. Browne fan ever since.

For those of you who don’t know him, Scott is the author of the novels Breathers (2009), Fated (2010), and Lucky Bastard (2012), as well as the novella I Saw Zombies Eating Santa Claus (2012) and the e-book short story collection Shooting Monkeys in a Barrel (2012).

He was born in Arizona and grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, spending most of his formative years in Fremont, California, as well as a short stint on the island of Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands, two-thousand miles southwest of Hawaii. From 1984 to 1989 he attended the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, where he majored in business organization and management and eventually realized that he wanted to be a writer.

After college, he moved to Hollywood, where he worked as a driver and an assistant producer doing post-production work on television spots and theatrical trailers for the Disney Studios. In 1992, he moved to Santa Cruz, California, where he lived for fourteen years writing novels and short stories and working as an office manager. In 2006 he completed his fourth novel, Breathers, which would become his first published novel in March 2009.

His writing has been influenced by Stephen King, Chuck Palahniuk, Christopher Moore, Kurt Vonnegut, and the films of Charlie Kaufman and Wes Anderson, among others.

In addition to writing, he enjoys biking, golfing, tai chi, and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. He currently lives in San Francisco.

And here he is, ladies and gentlemen, Scott G. Browne!

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Scott G. Browne:  I always like the idea of flipping things around and wondered what if would be like if I were the zombie instead of the human. But rather than your stereotypical mindless, shambling zombie with an obsession for human flesh, I was a sentient reanimated corpse with no rights who was gradually decomposing. I wondered how society would treat me. What my parents would think. If I could join a bowling league. These were the questions that compelled me. When you think about it, most zombie fiction is about humans and how they deal with the problem of zombies. My stories are about zombies and how they deal with the problem of humans.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

SB:  I am definitely not prepared. I live in San Francisco and I don’t even have an earthquake emergency kit, so chances are I’m not on Darwin’s short list. And I’m not overly optimistic that humanity would win. We have a lot of issues and once the zombie apocalypse happens, I’m guessing everyone who needs therapy is going to implode.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

SB:  This Dark Earth by John Hornor Jacobs. It had a unique narrative structure with compelling characters and beautiful prose.  It felt as real as anything I could imagine and was one of those rare novels that made me wish I’d written it.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

SB:  The splinter-through-the-eye scene in Lucio Fulci’s Zombie (aka Zombi 2). I saw that film at the theater when I was fourteen in a double bill with Scanners and the scene has always stuck with me.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

SB:  I’ve heard it said that the popularity of zombies is a direct reflection of our global fears about the economy and terrorism. Maybe it is, but I didn’t write Breathers or I Saw Zombies Eating Santa Claus out of any concern about Wall Street or Al-Qaeda. I dealt more with the concepts of prejudice and discrimination and civil rights. So I’m probably not tapped into the pulse of the nation on this one. You ask me, I think the current popularity of zombies is telling us that we’re tired of vampires and that we’re just not ready for the idea of a werewolf apocalypse. 

Check out Scott’s books here, and his website here

Oh yeah, and while you’re shopping Scott’s books, don’t forget to pre-order your copy of my next zombie novel, The Savage Dead.

Tonia Brown

I love coming of age stories.  I also love stories about characters who have their notion of loyalty tested to the breaking point.  So I was very pleased when I found both in a book called Skin Trade, written by today’s guest in my countdown to the release of The Savage Dead, Mrs. Tonia Brown.  The book takes place against the backdrop of the Great Undead Uprising of 1870, and features some of the best world building I’ve read since my first encounters with Cherie Priest and Robert Jackson Bennett.  I loved the story, and was delighted to provide a cover quote for it. I have since made it a point to read everything of hers I can put my hands on, including her latest, Devouring Milo, which, while it doesn’t contain zombies, is nonetheless some of the coolest horror to come along in recent years.

Tonia Brown describes herself as a southern author with a penchant for Victorian dead things. She writes everything from humor (Badass Zombie Road Trip) to horror (Skin Trade) to steampunk (The Cold Beneath) to erotica (Lucky Stiff: Memoirs of an Undead Lover.) And yes, all of those books contain some form of zombie. Even her long running weird western webserial Railroad! has at least one undead character in it, though in truth Ched prefers if you call him not-dead.  He’s not alive, yet he’s not dead either.  She has also recently launched yet another webserial, Confessions of a Villainess, which follows the diary of super villain Sylvia Fowler as she laments her various and often failed efforts toward world domination.

If you haven’t read Tonia Brown yet, you’re in for a treat.

 

Joe McKinney:  Thanks for joining me here on Old Major’s Dream.  I’m glad you could swing by.  You’re no stranger to zombie fiction.  Would you mind telling the folks out there a little about your zombie-related writing?  How do you approach the genre?

Tonia Brown:  Thanks for having me, Joe! While I love traditional zombies, when writing I find myself leaning toward unusual forms of zombies and zombie tales. I like writing sentient zees or weird origins for the undead or strange ways of dealing with them. Such as Peter, the undead lover in Lucky Stiff, or in the Skin Trade, where folks hunt and skin zombies for profit.

JM:  The zombie apocalypse is happening right now.  Are you prepared?  Would humanity win?

TB:  Me? Prepared? Oh, no. No, no, no, no, no. You see, there is a word for someone like me when the z-poc hits. That word is lunch.  As for humanity, there is a word for you when I turn. That word is also lunch. See how easy that was?

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie book, movie, short story, whatever?  (Please feel free to ramble as much or as little as you like here.  I’d love to know why that story or movie or whatever grabs you.)

TB:  “I’m running this monkey farm now, Frankenstein and I wanna know what the *&$% you are doing with my time!”

The original Day of the Dead. I love this film because it moves past the ‘origins’ phase which I think slows down most films. Then it moves past the ‘survivor’ phase, which can be enjoyable, I think is a bit overdone as well. This one throws you right into the ‘getting on with it’ phase of the z-pocalypse.  It asks more questions than it answers, sure, but that is the whole thing about such a scenario—there are no answers, no matter how hard you look.  The pilot had the right idea from the beginning. Leave it all behind and enjoy the time you have left.

JM:  What’s your favorite zombie kill scene of all time?

TB:  The lawnmower scene in Peter Jackson’s Dead Alive.  (AKA Braindead) Just when you think our intrepid heroes are done for, and that the hordes of undead monsters will eat them all, Lionel comes out with that lawnmower strapped across his back and just starts hacking away at the lot of them. The blood! The horror! The awesomeness! Why did no one else think about a lawnmower? Everyone goes for a chainsaw or other gardening instruments. Trust Jackson to get weird about it.  Bless him.

JM:  I’ve always felt the best and most effective horror is trying to investigate what we think of ourselves and what it means to be us.  Washington Irving’s tales, for instance, generally grapple with the question of what it means to be an American in the post-Revolutionary War period.  Nathaniel Hawthorne battled with the intellectual promise of a nation rising to international credibility while simultaneously choking under the yolk of a Puritan past.  Stephen King made a name for himself chronicling the slow collapse of the American small town way of life.  What do you think the zombie and its current popularity is telling us about ourselves?

TB:  They say a great zombie tale isn’t about the undead but is in fact about the survivors. And aren’t the survivors always such unique cast of characters? The focus of these stories always seem to consist of completely different men and women that bring something exclusive to the clan. But what about the rest of us? We can’t all be sharpshooters or doctors or whatever else the story needs. So, what is left?

While the story may focus on unique survivors, the zombies themselves represent the average human. You know us well. We’re your neighbors and coworkers and the parents of your kid’s friends. We work for retail outlets and watch hours of TV and get very little exercise and eat things that are terrible for us. Most likely, we are, in fact, you.

I think that is why zees are so popular these days, because in those hordes we recognize ourselves. There is very little difference between the brain dead consumer and the shuffling, undead masses. Except maybe the smell. But then again…

Check out Tonia’s books here, and her great webserial Railroad! here.

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